Wednesday, 31 August 2016

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – Y Pedwarau


Gaer Fach (SO 009 366)

This is the thirty third post under the heading of Significant Name Changes, and the following details are in respect of a hill that was surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 on the 18th August 2015.

The hill is part of Mynydd Epynt, which is a group of hills situated in the south-eastern part of mid and west Wales.  The hill is positioned between the small communities of Merthyr Cynog to the west north-west and Lower Chapel to the east south-east.

Gaer Fach (SO 009 366)

The hill appeared in the 400m P30 list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website under the partly invented name Pen Gaer Fach, with an accompanying note stating; Name from summit hillfort.  This listing of hills is now co-authored with Aled Williams and known as Y Pedwarau.  



Pen Gaer Fach
    415m
    SO009366
    160
  188
    Name from summit hillfort
  

During my early hill listing I thought it appropriate to either invent a name for a hill, or use a name that appeared near to the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  My preference was to use farm names and put Pen, Bryn or Moel in front of them or as in this instance, use the name of the summit hillfort and add the word Pen.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with a little research either conducted locally or historically an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found.  

As an appropriate name for this hill already exists on current Ordnance Survey maps; Gaer Fach, the invented and prefixed word of Pen is wholly unnecessary and therefore the name this hill is now listed by in Y Pedwarau (Europeaklist May 2013 and Haroldstreet January 2014) is Gaer Fach.  

Extract from the current Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer map

Please note, the current Ordnance Survey enlarged map on the Geograph website gives the composition of this name as Caer fach, in this instance it is appropriate to use Gaer with a ‘G’ and Fach with a capital ‘F’.

Extract from the current Ordnance Survey enlarged map on the Geograph website with inappropriate composition

  
The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Mynydd Epynt

Name:  Gaer Fach

Previously Listed Name:  Pen Gaer Fach 

Summit Height:  413.3m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  160

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 00915 36622 
 
Drop:  35.5m





Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (August 2016)





Tuesday, 30 August 2016

Mapping Mountains – Trimble Surveys – Long Mynd


28.08.16  Burway Hill (SO 440 942, previously Trimbled))


Burway Hill (SO 440 942)

Burway Hill is easily accessible if wanting a relatively quick ascent as it is positioned beside the minor road that makes its way west from Church Stretton over the Long Mynd to the East Onny valley.

The closeness of this minor road does not detract from the appeal of the hill, as its northern and southern slopes are steep sided plunging down to the Carding Mill and Townbrook Valley’s respectively.

Its eastern ridge descends to the outskirts of Ashbrook and Church Stretton, whilst its western slopes are sharp and steep leading down to its connecting col, from here the land continues toward the highest part of the hill range; Pole Bank.

Today the Long Mynd was a hive of activity with a multitude of cars squeezing past one another on the steep minor road; mountain bikes were either being pushed or their riders were struggling uphill whilst walkers were dotted on distant horizons seemingly on each and every path and summit.  We were a part of the car influx, and as the day was beautifully warm with sunshine highlighting the purpled heather we stopped and Lou and I took the opportunity to visit the summit of Burway Hill.

We parked beside the col, which along with the hill’s summit had previously been Trimbled whilst on a walk with Charlie Leventon in February 2014.  A grassed path leads from the col to the attractive rocky summit, and although steep it is no more than a head down and a bead of sweat on brow ascent.

Lou - ready for all eventualities

As I followed Lou up the rubbled path I smiled as she stopped and expressed concern that there may be snakes in the heather, between my smiles I encouraged her onward.

Looking out for snakes

The summit was soon reached and we stayed on top for ten minutes or so admiring the view, away to the north-east the distinct profiles of Caer Caradoc Hill and The Lawley bulged up from the greenness of the valley below, their profiles led the eye toward the distant Wrekin, which is an outlier of the Shropshire hills.

Lou at the summit of Burway Hill

The view north with Caer Caradoc Hill, The Lawley and The Wrekin

As we descended we looked beyond Pole Bank where he sky was massing grey, its darkened colour foretelling heavy rain, and yet on the Long Mynd the walkers, picnickers and cyclists were out, bathed in sunshine.

The descent proved fun; thankfully we didn’t encounter any snakes and made it down to the car in one piece.  Our drive continued eastward toward the Stiperstones where the rain seemed embedded for the remainder of the afternoon, looking back the upper part of the Long Mynd was now cloaked in grey cloud and decidedly wet, we’d timed our visit well.




Survey Result:

Burway Hill

Summit Height:  402.8m

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 44061 94220

Col Height:  373.1m

Col Grid Reference:  SO 43986 94261

Drop:  29.7m (Sub-Four status confirmed)






Monday, 29 August 2016

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – 100m Twmpau


Cae Boncyn (SJ 238 193)

This is the thirty second post under the heading of Significant Name Changes, and the following details are in respect of a hill that was surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 on the 8th August 2015.

The hill is part of the Carnedd Wen range, which is an extensive group of hills situated in the southern part of north Wales.  It is positioned between the small communities of Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain to the north-west, Llanymynech to the east north-east, Four Crosses to the east and Ardd-lin (Arddleen) to the south south-east.

The green field of Cae Boncyn (SJ 238 193) above Gelli Farm


The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Cae Boncyn

The hill appeared in the 100m P30 list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website under an invented name of Bryn y Gelli, with an accompanying note stating; Name from farm to the South-West.  The listing this hill is now a part of is named Twmpau (thirty welsh metre prominences and upward) and its summit height was confirmed by the survey with the Trimble. 



Bryn y Gelli
    142m
    SJ239194
    126
  240
    Name from farm to the South-West


During my early hill listing I thought it appropriate to either invent a name for a hill, or use a name that appeared near to the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  My preference was to use farm names and put Pen, Bryn or Moel in front of them, and in this instance it was that of Gelli Farm.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with a little research either conducted locally or historically an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found.

When I visited this hill with Alex Cameron we asked permission to do so from Mel Jones, the owner of Gelli Farm, who was sitting outside the farm house enjoying the afternoon’s sunshine.  As we descended to the awaiting car which was parked in the farm yard I took the opportunity to ask Mel about the name of the hill and he said that he had something that might be of interest to us.  He then disappeared in to the farm house and re-appeared with a Field map of Gelli Farm, dated January 1924.

The Gelli Farm Field map, dated January 1924


The Gelli Farm Field map

The map outlined the property adjoined to Gelli Farm and named each individual field, for someone interested in upland place-name research it was like unearthing a treasure trove, and Mel explained that his Father had passed the Field map down to him.  I asked about the high point of the hill above Gelli Farm and Mel knew what field it was situated in and told us that it is known as Cae Boncyn.

The Field map names each individual field

Although I scribbled down some of the information Mel gave me it was easier to take photos of the Field map which he kindly let me do, as well as giving me permission to reproduce them on this site.

Mel Jones with the Gelli Farm Field map

One would imagine that the details on the Tithe map would match those on Mel’s Field map of Gelli Farm; in the main they do not.  There may be a number of reasons for this, but the most likely is that the field names known at the time of the Tithe map compilation were in the main not passed down to following occupants of Gelli Farm and by the time of 1924 the occupant of Gelli Farm knew many of the individual fields by different names.

The name of the field that takes in the summit of this hill on the Tithe map is Little Bank Field.  The term Tithe map is generally given to a map of a Welsh or English parish or township and which was prepared after the 1836 Tithe Commutation Act.  This act allowed tithes to be paid in cash rather than goods.  The Tithe maps gave names of owners and occupiers of land in each parish and importantly for place-name research they also included the name of enclosed land.  This enclosed land is usually based on a field system, however not every field is given a name, but many are and especially so in Wales.

Accessing information on the Tithe map is simplified by the use of a split screen enabling the summit to be pinpointed on the map on the right and for the same point to appear on the Tithe map on the left

The enclosed land where the field named as Little Bank Field is situated is given the number 1155 on the Tithe map, this can be cross referenced against the apportionments; it is these apportionments that give the name of the owner or occupier of the land as well as the name of the land.  The land where the summit of this hill is situated on the Tithe map is named as Little Bank Field and described as Arable; it appears in the county named as Montgomery and in the parish of Llansanffrraid ym Mechain.  

The land where the summit of this hill is situated is named as Little Bank Field on the Tithe map

It is important when studying these apportionments to compare the number given on the Tithe map with the information given in the apportionments, as in this instance there are two adjacent fields given the number 1155, the westerly placed field is named Little Bank Field and the easterly placed field is named Bank by John Foulkes.

It is also interesting comparing the information on the earlier Tithe map with that on the 1924 Gelli Farm Field map, when doing so there are two fields whose names can be considered that match; Field under house on the Tithe map and Field below house on the Gelli Farm Field map, and The Maes on the Tithe map and Maes on the Gelli Farm Field map.  However, there is also an example where the same name is used but for different fields, this is; Sideland.  We can deduct from this that at least some of the names used when the Tithe map was compiled are still in use today, whilst many others have been supplanted by new names, including that of Cae Boncyn.  


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Carnedd Wen

Name:  Cae Boncyn

Previously Listed Name:  Bryn y Gelli 

Summit Height:  142.1m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  126

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 23849 19306  

Drop:  44m




Myrddyn Phillips (August 2016)






Saturday, 27 August 2016

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – 100m Twmpau


Gors Leasow (SJ 228 180)

This is the thirty first post under the heading of Significant Name Changes, and the following details are in respect of a hill that was surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 on the 8th August 2015.

The hill is part of the Carnedd Wen range, which is an extensive group of hills situated in the southern part of north Wales.  It is positioned between the small communities of Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain to the north, Llanymynech to the north-east, Four Crosses to the east and Ardd-lin (Arddleen) to the south-east.

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Gors Leasow

The hill appeared in the 100m list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website under an invented name of Bryn Trewylan, with an accompanying note stating; Name from hall to the South.  The listing this hill is now a part of is named Twmpau (thirty welsh metre prominences and upward) and its summit height was confirmed by the survey with the Trimble. 


Bryn Trewylan
    162m
    SJ229181
    126
  240
    Name from hall to the South


During my early hill listing I thought it appropriate to either invent a name for a hill, or use a name that appeared near to the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  My preference was to use farm names and put Pen, Bryn or Moel in front of them, or as in this instance, use the name of Trewylan Hall, a large residence to the south of the summit.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with a little research either conducted locally or historically an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found.

The name this hill is now listed by is Gors Leasow, and this was derived from the Tithe map.  The term Tithe map is generally given to a map of a Welsh or English parish or township and which was prepared after the 1836 Tithe Commutation Act.  This act allowed tithes to be paid in cash rather than goods.  The Tithe maps gave names of owners and occupiers of land in each parish and importantly for place-name research they also included the name of enclosed land.  This enclosed land is usually based on a field system, however not every field is given a name, but many are and especially so in Wales.

Accessing information on the Tithe map is simplified by the use of a split screen enabling the summit to be pinpointed on the map on the right and for the same point to appear on the Tithe map on the left

The enclosed land where the summit of Gors Leasow is situated is given the number 1406 on the Tithe map, this can be cross referenced against the apportionments; it is these apportionments that give the name of the owner or occupier of the land as well as the name of the land.  The land where the summit of this hill is situated is named as Gos Leasow and described as Arable; it appears in the county named as Montgomery and in the parish of Llansanffrraid ym Mechain. 

The land where the summit of this hill is situated is named Gos Leasow on the Tithe map

It is important when studying these apportionments to consider the spelling of each word and in this instance the word Gos precedes that of Leasow.  The latter word means Pasture or Meadowland, whilst the former has no meaning either in English or in Welsh.  However, the Welsh word Cors (mutated to Gors) when translated in to English means Bog or Marsh and local pronunciation favours the ‘r’ becoming silent.  Therefore Gors Leasow can be translated as Marshy Pasture or Boggy Meadowland.


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Carnedd Wen

Name:  Gors Leasow

Previously Listed Name:  Bryn Trewylan 

Summit Height:  161.6m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  126

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 22864 18055 
 
Drop:  c 51m





Myrddyn Phillips (August 2016)







Thursday, 25 August 2016

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – 100m Twmpau


Gravel Pit Field (SJ 233 171)

This is the thirtieth post under the heading of Significant Name Changes, and the following details are in respect of a hill that was surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 on the 8th August 2015.

The hill is part of the Carnedd Wen range, which is an extensive group of hills situated in the southern part of north Wales.  It is situated in the district known as Deuddwr and is positioned between the small communities of Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain to the north, Llanymynech to the north-east, Four Crosses to the east north-east and Ardd-lin (Arddleen) to the south-east.

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Gravel Pit Field

The hill appeared in the 100m list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website under the name of Ty-Top.  The listing this hill is now a part of is named Twmpau (thirty welsh metre prominences and upward) and its summit height was confirmed by the survey with the Trimble. 


Ty-Top
      154m
      SJ233172
      126
   240

 
During my early hill listing I thought it appropriate to either invent a name for a hill, or use a name that appeared near to the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  My preference was to use farm names and put Pen, Bryn or Moel in front of them, or as in this instance, use the name of what was presumed to be a near house.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with a little research either conducted locally or historically an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found.

The name this hill is now listed by is Gravel Pit Field, and this was derived from the Tithe map.  The term Tithe map is generally given to a map of a Welsh or English parish or township and which was prepared after the 1836 Tithe Commutation Act.  This act allowed tithes to be paid in cash rather than goods.  The Tithe maps gave names of owners and occupiers of land in each parish and importantly for place-name research they also included the name of enclosed land.  This enclosed land is usually based on a field system, however not every field is given a name, but many are and especially so in Wales.

Accessing information on the Tithe map is simplified by the use of a split screen enabling the lay of land as it is today on the map on the right to be compared against the lay of land as it was during the time of the Tithe map

The enclosed land where the summit of Gravel Pit Field is situated is given the number 1521 on the Tithe map, this can be cross referenced against the apportionments; it is these apportionments that give the name of the owner or occupier of the land as well as the name of the land.  The land where the summit of this hill is situated is named as Gravel Pit Field; it appears in the county named as Montgomery and in the parish of Llansanffraid ym Mechain. 

When cross referenced in the apportionments the enclosed land where the summit of this hill is situated is named as Gravel Pit Field

Please note; this is the second consecutive entry under the Significant Name Changes heading that has detailed a hill with the name of Gravel Pit Field, to complicate matters both hills were surveyed on the same day and both appear in the same post on this site.  However, they are different hills.


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Carnedd Wen

Name:  Gravel Pit Field

Previously Listed Name:  Ty-Top 

Summit Height:  153.4m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  126

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 23345 17175 
 
Drop:  37m





Myrddyn Phillips (August 2016)





Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Mapping Mountains – Hill Reclassifications – The 500-Metre Tops of Ireland


Pigeon Rock Mountain North Top (J 261 250)

There has been a reclassification to The 500-Metre Tops of Ireland list due to a re-assessment of information on Ordnance Survey of Northern Ireland maps.  This is the second reclassification to this list since its data were re-evaluated for publication on the Database of British and Irish Hills (DoBIH).  The hill is situated in the central western part of the Mourne Mountains in the north-east of Ireland, and is positioned between the small communities of Hilltown to its north-west and Attical to its south.

Access to the hill can be gained from its easterly side where car parking near to the high point of the B27 road gives relatively easy access up its easterly flank; otherwise a more challenging walk can take in this hill whilst visiting a number of adjacent peaks following the course of the Mourne wall.

The hill is named Pigeon Rock Mountain North Top and its summit is positioned at J 261 250.  The south top of this hill is currently listed as Pigeon Rock Mountain with a 534m high summit at J 264 244 with 141m of drop.  Pigeon Rock Mountain North Top was not included in the Sub list that accompanied the main list when published on D0BIH as debate on its prominence favoured c 19m, however this has been re-assessed and detail from a number of Ordnance Survey of Northern Ireland maps have been examined, the details appear below:


OS historic map:  1749ft (530m converted to current datum) for north top and 1755ft (532m converted to current datum) for south top

Map 29:  534m for north top, no spot height for south top.

Harvey map:  534m for north top and 534m for south top.

Mourne Country Outdoor Pursuits map (OS of NI publication 1990):  533m for north top and 534m for south top.

Mournes Activity map (OS of NI publication [update from the Outdoor Pursuits map] 2009):  534m for north top and 534m for south top.


After re-assessment of the above data we have decided to include Pigeon Rock Mountain North Top as a new Sub adjoined to the main 500-Metre Irish list.

This now brings the overall total for The 500-Metre Tops of Ireland to 201 and the Subs have increased by two compared to when the list was published on DoBIH.

Thanks to Jim Bloomer for supplying historical map information and suggesting this hill’s re-assessment.



The full details for the hill are:

Cardinal Hill:  Slieve Donard

Summit Height:  534m

Name:  Pigeon Rock Mountain North Top

OS of NI 1:50,000 map:  29

Summit Grid Reference:  J 261 250

Drop:  c 20m



Michael Dewey and Myrddyn Phillips (August 2016)






Tuesday, 23 August 2016

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – 100m Twmpau


Gravel Pit Field (SJ 225 167)

This is the twenty ninth post under the heading of Significant Name Changes, and the following details are in respect of a hill that was surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 on the 8th August 2015.

The hill is part of the Carnedd Wen range, which is an extensive group of hills situated in the southern part of north Wales.  It is positioned between the small communities of Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain to the north, Four Crosses to the east north-east and Ardd-lin (Arddleen) to the east south-east.

The Trimble GeoXH 6000 gathering data at the summit of Gravel Pit Field

The hill appeared in the 100m list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website under an invented name of The Mount, with an accompanying note stating; Name from buildings to the South-East.  The listing this hill is now a part of is named Twmpau (thirty welsh metre prominences and upward) and its summit height was confirmed by the survey with the Trimble. 


The Mount
   154m
   SJ225166
 126
 240
  Name from buildings to the South-East. Trig pillar.


During my early hill listing I thought it appropriate to either invent a name for a hill, or use a name that appeared near to the summit of the hill on Ordnance Survey maps of the day.  My preference was to use farm names and put Pen, Bryn or Moel in front of them, or as in this instance, use the name of a near house.  This is not a practice that I now advocate as with a little research either conducted locally or historically an appropriate name for the hill can usually be found.

The name this hill is now listed by is Gravel Pit Field, and this was derived from the Tithe map.  The term Tithe map is generally given to a map of a Welsh or English parish or township and which was prepared after the 1836 Tithe Commutation Act.  This act allowed tithes to be paid in cash rather than goods.  The Tithe maps gave names of owners and occupiers of land in each parish and importantly for place-name research they also included the name of enclosed land.  This enclosed land is usually based on a field system, however not every field is given a name, but many are and especially so in Wales.

Accessing information on the Tithe map is simplified by the use of a split screen enabling the lay of land as it is today on the map on the right to be compared against the lay of land as it was during the time of the Tithe map

With the aid of an overlay the two sets of information can be directly compared

The enclosed land where the summit of Gravel Pit Field is situated is given the number 288 on the Tithe map, this can be cross referenced against the apportionments; it is these apportionments that give the name of the owner or occupier of the land as well as the name of the land.  The land where the summit of this hill is situated is named as Gravel Pit Field; it appears in the county named as Montgomery and in the parish of Meifod. 

When cross referenced in the apportionments the enclosed land where the summit of this hill is situated is named as Gravel Pit Field

It is important when studying these apportionments to compare the number given on the Tithe map with the information given in the apportionments, as in this instance there are at least three other references to the number 288, by doing so it is relatively easy to ascertain which number applies to the land where the summit of the hill is situated, with this hill there are a number of clues, including the number 330 and its description as Mount House Buildings, this reference applies to the house that gave its name to this hill in the original P30 lists on Geoff’s v-g.me website.


The full details for the hill are:

Group:  Carnedd Wen

Name:  Gravel Pit Field

Previously Listed Name:  The Mount 

Summit Height:  154.9m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  126

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 22598 16703 
 
Drop:  c 47m




Myrddyn Phillips (August 2016)