Saturday, 29 April 2017

Mapping Mountains – Significant Name Changes – 200m Twmpau


Moel Feliarth (SH 993 117)

This is the seventy third post under the heading of Significant Name Changes, and the following details are in respect of a hill that was surveyed with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 on the 4th April 2017.

The hill is adjoined to the Y Berwyn group of hills, which is situated in the south-eastern part of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A4), and is positioned above and to the immediate north of the A 458 and the small community of Y Foel

Moel Feliarth (SH 993 117)

The hill appeared in the 200m P30 list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website under the name Foel.  The listing this hill is now a part of is named Twmpau (thirty welsh metre prominences and upward) and its height, drop and status was confirmed by a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000. 


Foel    258m    SH993117    125239
 

During my early hill listing I paid little regard to name placement on a map, or the meaning of names and to what feature the name was appropriately applied to.  Therefore I prioritised names for listing purposes that I now understand are either inappropriate or where another name is viewed as being more appropriate.  By using the name Foel for this hill I was conveniently using the name that appears on current Ordnance Survey maps and which is now strictly given to the village immediately to the south of the hill.

During my research for an appropriate name for this hill I consulted the Tithe map.  The term Tithe map is generally given to a map of a Welsh or English parish or township and which was prepared after the 1836 Tithe Commutation Act.  This act allowed tithes to be paid in cash rather than goods.  The Tithe maps gave names of owners and occupiers of land in each parish and importantly for place-name research they also included the name of enclosed land.  This enclosed land is usually based on a field system, however not every field is given a name, but many are and especially so in Wales.

Accessing information on the Tithe map is simplified with the use of a split screen enabling the boundary of enclosed land to be compared

I took two data sets from the area of this hill’s summit, one on the northern and one on the southern side of the summit fence that is placed in a west to east direction across the upper part of the hill.  The enclosed land where the first data set was taken from (SH 99327 11775) is given the number 1081 on the Tithe map, this can be cross referenced against the apportionments; it is these apportionments that give the name of the owner or occupier of the land as well as the name of the land.  The land where this first data set was taken is named Coed yr Hen Ffordd on the Tithe map and described as Pasture.  The enclosed land where the second data set was taken from (SH 99345 11749) and which proved to be the higher is given the number 1102 in the apportionments and named as Borfa Hir on the Tithe map and described as Pasture; these appear in the county named as Montgomery and in the parish of Llangadfan.

The land where the first data set for the Trimble was taken from is named Coed yr Hen Ffordd on the Tithe map

The land where the second and higher data set for the Trimble was taken from is named Borfa Hir on the Tithe map

However, although the Tithe map gives names for the enclosed land at the summit area of this hill, it would be more appropriate to use a name for the hill and since publication of these P30 lists on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website there have been a number of Ordnance Survey maps made available online, some of these are historical such as the series of Six-Inch maps on the National Library of Scotland website, whilst others are current and digitally updated such as the enlarged map on the Geograph website.  Two of the historical maps now available are the Ordnance Survey Draft Surveyors map which formed the basis for the Ordnance Survey One-Inch ‘Old Series’ map, and it was the former map that gives the name of the hill as Moel Feliarth.

The Ordnance Survey Draft Surveyors map names the hill as Moel Feliarth

This information is substantiated by detail given in the Dictionary of the Place-Names of Wales (Hywel Wyn Owen and Richard Morgan, published by Gomer Press 2007) where on page 154 – 155 a history and explanation of the composition and the use of this name is given.

Therefore the name this hill is now listed by in the Twmpau is Moel Feliarth, and this was derived from the Ordnance Survey Draft Surveyors map and substantiated by information given in the Dictionary of the Place-Names of Wales.


The full details for the hill are:


Group:  Y Berwyn

Name:  Moel Feliarth

Previously Listed Name:  Foel 

Summit Height:  259.8m (converted to OSGM15)

OS 1:50,000 map:  125

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 99345 11749 
 
Drop:  34.7m (converted to OSGM15)





Myrddyn Phillips (April 2017)




Friday, 28 April 2017

Mapping Mountains – Trimble Surveys – Y Berwyn


04.04.17  Moel Feliarth (SH 993 117)

Moel Feliarth (SH 993 117)

Moel Feliarth stands immediately above and to the north of the small community of Foel, which is positioned beside the A 458 road as it heads west from Welshpool.  It is an unassuming small hill tucked away from the road with sheep grazing land predominating.  Today it was bathed in sunshine and I decided to visit and Trimble it after attending a friend’s Mother’s funeral in the near-by Llangadfan.

The hill is encircled on three sides by a green track which is designated a public footpath, however when I approached the first access point to it I was met by fallen tree branches and a mass of brambles, I made a hasty retreat and hoped that easier access could be found further through the village.

Once on the green track it led northward toward the area of the hill’s bwlch, this proved expansive on the valley to valley traverse and consisted of a closely cropped field with a number of inquisitive sheep as I approached what I considered to be the critical point for Trimble placement.

Heading up the green track

On the western side of the area of the bwlch is an attractive pool not shown on Ordnance Survey maps, before choosing the spot to set the Trimble up I assessed the lay of land from a number of directions, and once the equipment was gathering data I stood back and relaxed in the quiet scene and hoped that the sheep that were now seemingly ignoring me and the Trimble would do so for at least the next five minutes of allotted data collection.

Gathering data at the critical bwlch of Moel Feliarth

Once data were stored I packed the Trimble away and headed through a gate and up next to a fence to the high point of the hill.  This is given as ground by a three way fence junction, with this junction positioned on an old hedge bank in the GPS entries on Hill Bagging.  Although ground on the old hedge bank was the highest on the hill I decided that this was man-made and concentrated my efforts on land to the immediate north and then south of it.

The ten figure grid reference given in the GPS entries on Hill Bagging indicate that the summit is just north of this old hedge bank, that is of course dependent upon the hedge bank being dismissed as not being a natural part of the hill.  I set the Trimble up on what I judged to be the highest point of this land just to the north of the fence and waited for the equipment to attain its 0.1m accuracy before data should be logged.  This took a good ten minutes as it was positioned directly under an overhanging tree.

Gathering data on the north side of the summit fence

During the waiting process for the equipment to attain its accuracy level and then to gather data I inspected the land to the south of the fence and decided that this looked higher.  Once five minutes of data were stored I headed to the south side of the summit fence and crouched down and assessed the lay of land, one or two firm mole hills vied for the high point and I judged ground close to two of these to be the high point on this side of the fence and also for that of the hill.

Gathering data at the summit of Moel Feliarth

I duly gathered another five minute data set and then headed down the southern slopes of the hill to find the footpath leading over the last field toward the narrow lane I had used on my ascent.  It had been a good small walk, albeit a teense chilly in the late afternoon on top waiting for the Trimble to do its stuff when propped on top of my rucksack which is often used as an improvised tripod, and which had my fleece coat neatly wrapped up inside of it.


Survey Result:



Summit Height:  259.8m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SH 99345 11749

Bwlch Height:  225.0m (converted to OSGM15)

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SH 99330 11944

Drop:  34.7m (200m Twmpau status confirmed)

Dominance:  13.37% 

 







Thursday, 27 April 2017

Mapping Mountains – Hill Reclassifications – The Fours


Reilth Top (SO 284 881) - Four reclassified to 400m Sub-Four

There has been a reclassification to the listing of The Fours with a Four being reclassified to the ranks of 400m Sub-Four due to a survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000.  The 400m Sub-Fours is one of three categories of sub hills that accompany the main The Fours list, with the criteria for Four status being all English hills at or above 400m and below 500m in height with 30m minimum drop, and the criteria for 400m Sub-Four status being all English hills at or above 400m and below 500m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop.

The hill is situated in the Beacon Hill group with its Cardinal Hill being Cilfaesty (SO 128 840) and is placed in Region 38, Section 38A Shropshire, and is positioned with the town of Bishop’s Castle towards its east.

The hill can be ascended from its south south-west or south-east where public footpaths give access to its lower slopes; however its summit is not a part of open access land so permission to visit should be sought.

The name of the hill is Reilth Top and prior to the survey with the Trimble GeoXH 6000 and its subsequent listing as a 400m Sub-Four it was listed as a Four with c 30m of drop based on an estimated summit height of c 406m with its uppermost summit contour on Ordnance Survey 1:25,000 Explorer maps being 405m, and an estimated col height of c 376m with col contouring between 375m – 380m.

The survey with the Trimble produced a summit height of 404.6m (converted to OSGM15) and a col height of 375.6m (converted to OSGM15), with these values giving this hill 29.0m of drop, which is insufficient for it to retain its Four status.


The full details for the hill produced by the Trimble are:


Cardinal Hill:  Cilfaesty

Summit Height:  404.6m (converted to OSGM15)

Name:  Reilth Top

OS 1:50,000 map:  137

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 28458 88105

Drop:  29.0m (converted to OSGM15)


Upon receiving the above details for confirmation of this hill’s reclassification Aled analysed LIDAR data and the details produced by the Trimble and LIDAR are given below:


Summit Height: 

404.6m (converted to OSGM15) at SO 28458 88105 for Trimble

404.6m at SO 28456 88108 for LIDAR



Col Height: 

375.6m (converted to OSGM15) at SO 28861 87869 for Trimble

375.3m at SO 28880 87845 for LIDAR



Drop:

29.0m for Trimble

29.3m for LIDAR


The col position and height being used is that produced by LIDAR data.


The overall total for The Fours is now 294 hills with two reclassifications, one each to 390m Sub-Four and 400m Sub-Four status since publication of the list by Europeaklist in December 2013.

The overall total for the 400m Sub-Fours is now 155 with this reclassification being to first addition to this sub category since publication of the list by Europeaklist in December 2013.

The list of Four hills is available from the Haroldstreet website (January 2014) with all subsequent changes detailed on the Mapping Mountains site.

For the additions and reclassifications to The Fours reported on Mapping Mountains since the December 2013 publication of the list by Europeaklist please consult the following Change Registers:







Gathering data at the summit of Reilth Top - now reclassified from a Four to a 400m Sub-Four


Myrddyn Phillips and Aled Williams (April 2017)

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Mapping Mountains – Hill Reclassifications – 100m Twmpau


Bryn y Llan or Highermost Gredington (SJ 453 383) - 100m Sub-Twmpau addition

There has been an addition to the listing of the 100m Twmpau (thirty welsh metre prominences and upward) due to analysis of the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping on the Geograph website by Myrddyn Phillips and which has now been refined and confirmed by analysis of LIDAR data by Aled Williams.  With the criteria for the 100m Twmpau being all Welsh hills 100m or more and below 200m in height with 30m minimum drop.

Accompanying the Twmpau list is a sub list entitled the Sub-Twmpau.  With the criteria for 100m Sub-Twmpau qualification being all Welsh hills at or above 100m and below 200m in height with 20m or more and below 30m of drop, with this addition affecting this sub category of hill.

Prior to analysis of the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping on the Geograph website and the subsequent analysis of LIDAR data the hill was not classified.  Analysis of the Ordnance Survey enlarged map gave the hill an estimated drop of c 23m based on the 114m summit spot height and an estimated bwlch height of c 91m, with these values being sufficient for the hill to be classified as a 100m Sub-Twmpau.

The hill is a part of the Maelor Saesneg group of hills, this part of Wales is the land to the east of the Afon Dyfrdwy (River Dee) and originated as a cantref of the Kingdom of Powys, with its Cardinal Hill being Pt. 157m (SJ 549 440) and is placed in the Region of North Wales (Region A, Sub-Region A4), and is situated with the small community of Hanmer to the north and Cumber’s Bank to the north north-west.

According to the map the summit of the hill is situated in mixed woodland and as it is not a part of open access land permission to visit the high point should be sought.  There is access toward the summit on public footpaths from the north originating from Hanmer that follows the eastern shore of Hanmer Mere, and from the south-west following the boundary of the woodland in its upper section.

The name of the hill is Bryn y Llan or Highermost Gredington and this was derived from the Tithe map by Aled Williams, and its addition to 100m Sub-Twmpau status is due to analysis of the Ordnance Survey enlarged mapping on the Geograph website by Myrddyn Phillips and confirmation of its status via LIDAR data analysed by Aled Williams.  LIDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) is highly accurate height data that is now freely available for much of England and Wales.

Aled’s analysis of LIDAR data gives the hill the following details:


Bryn y Llan or Highermost Gredington

Summit Height:  115.1m

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 45301 38375

Bwlch Height:  91.0m

Bwlch Grid Reference:  SJ 51088 36435

Drop:  24.1m


Therefore, the 115.1m LIDAR data produced for the summit position at SJ 45301 38375 and the 91.0m LIDAR data produced for the bwlch position at SJ 51088 36435 gives this hill 24.1m of drop, which is sufficient for its inclusion as a 100m Sub-Twmpau, therefore this hill is included in this sub category and the total in the Twmpau will be updated accordingly.


The full details for the hill are:

Cardinal Hill:  Pt. 157m (SJ 549 440)

Summit Height:  115.1m (LIDAR data)

Name:  Bryn y Llan or Highermost Gredington

OS 1:50,000 map:  126

Summit Grid Reference:  SJ 45301 38375 
  
Drop:  24.1m (LIDAR data)



My thanks to Aled Williams for sending the details of this hill to me.

Myrddyn Phillips (April 2017)


Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Mapping Mountains – Trimble Surveys – Beacon Hill


25.03.17  Reilth Top (SO 284 881), Colebatch Hill (SO 292 874) and Bryn Hill (SO 295 862)

Colebatch Hill (SO 292 874)

The Shropshire hills can give a tranquil experience, especially so under seemingly never ending blue sky with distant views and hour after hour of solitude.  Today I wanted to test my wonky right knee with something more than just one small hill, so I opted to join three small hills together and try and time my completion for a 6.00pm – 7.00pm arrival at Clun YH to join the evening’s festivities at the annual Triggers meet.

I parked beside a no parking sign on a large patch of muddied road leaving sufficient access in all directions to all gate and drive entrances, and headed up a delightful green track toward the summit of my first hill of the day; Reilth Top.  Heading up the track the sun cascaded out of a deep blue sky and the slight chilled late March morning added to the freshness of early spring warmth.

The summit of Reilth Top is in a closely cropped grassed field with a covered reservoir in its corner, as I gathered the first of what proved to be three data sets from the area of this hill’s summit two walker’s approached, I waved and heading my way were Richard and Denise Mclellan, I’d corresponded with Richard via email in the past and was a friend of Denise’s on Facebook, but this was the first time that I had met them.  We chatted for ten to fifteen minutes as the sun shone and the Trimble gathered the first of its three data sets.  They had walked from Clun and were heading down for lunch followed by the walk back to the Youth Hostel, and had come over the hills that I planned on visiting later in the day, so I checked on the route ahead.  As they waved their good buys I set the Trimble up to gather its third data set and once complete, closed it off, packed it away and headed down to the col connecting Reilth Top with Colebatch Hill.

Gathering the first data set on the summit area of Reilth Top

Denise and Richard Mclellan

Gathering data at the summit of Reilth Top

I’d come prepared with a number of 10 figure grid references for each summit and col and had been told by Richard that the connecting col looked as if it was positioned in a paddock which had horses in it, this wasn’t ideal.  However, when I arrived near the col I thought the critical point to lay next to the paddock and wondered if I could sneak in to land behind a large barn and gather five minutes of data without being disturbed, so I crept through a gate and wandered around a bit looking at the grid reference on the Trimble’s screen and at the same time trying to assess the lay of land which looked relatively flat, it was then that I spotted a figure heading toward me, he didn’t really ask me what I was doing, but his mannerisms did, so I explained anyway.  He thought I’d better explain to the person at the adjacent Vron Farm, so off we both marched, a few minutes later and the woman at the farm had given me permission to take data from wherever I wanted, it so happened that the point I decided to gather data from was in the adjacent land between the paddock and the farm’s and which was owned by the person who had first approached me.  I set the Trimble up and stood back once it was activated, a few minutes later and the same person came down toward me again looking inquisitively at what I was doing but asking few if any questions, I mesmerized him with Trimble figures and smiled a lot which seemed to help, and then packed the equipment away once it had gathered five minutes of data, thanked him for his time and walked toward the connecting footpath toward Colebatch Hill.

Gathering data at the critical col of Reilth Top

I initially followed the public footpath that contours round the northern part of Colebatch Hill, before leaving it to follow a hedge line direct up the hill toward the manicured green field where the summit is situated.  I spent a few minutes assessing the lay of land from different directions before choosing the spot for Trimble placement.

Gathering data from the summit of Colebatch Hill

Below to the south lay my next objective, the connecting col between Colebatch Hill and Bryn Hill, however this was positioned in a field between two houses so I thought the wisest approach would be to ask permission to visit, leaving the summit behind I wandered down the southerly slopes and skirted woodland on its east before finding a metalled gate leading to a path through the front of what looked like a small holding, this led onto the gravelled track heading down from the house to the minor road in the valley beyond, toward the end of the track were two people busy at work erecting large poles in the ground.  I stopped and chatted and explained what I hoped to do and asked if I could head in to the adjacent fields.  Permission was duly granted and I was directed through the grounds of the next house which was a holiday home which wasn’t occupied this weekend, this gave me peace of mind and I contentedly made my way up the field and through the gate to the property and then down the access track toward the field and the connecting col.

This col proved a quiet affair with just an occasional vehicle chugging its way over the lane above me whilst the sheep grazed and the Trimble slowly ebbed down to its 0.1m accuracy level before data should be logged, once this was attained I pressed ‘Log’ and stood back for the allotted five minutes of data to be collected.

Gathering data at the critical col of Bryn Hill

Heading up the field to a gate I followed a forestry track in to Blakeridge Wood which swamps the eastern side of Bryn Hill.  I followed this track for quite some time and decided to head back to the lane when it started to go downhill and lead away from the summit.  By doubling back it gave me over a mile of unnecessary walking which isn’t much in the grand scheme of things but I didn’t want to overtax my right knee, so this proved an unwelcome addition to the days exertions, but being on the forestry track gave me views northward toward the Stiperstones, which is one of the undoubted highlights of the Shropshire hills.

Distant view of the Stiperstones

Getting back on to the lane was a relief but I now had to descend over 40m in height as I followed the lane down through the quiet surrounds of Cefn Einion.  I then branched left on the continuation of the lane to a track which gave me access to a gate and the steepening western slopes of Bryn Hill.  Field after field and gate after gate led me up to the summit which is situated in the field adjacent to the forestry that I’d backtracked out of an hour or so ago. 

House front in Cefn Einion

I took two data sets from the summit area of Bryn Hill, one on ground beside a small covered reservoir and one where I judged the high point to be in the field leading toward the forest.  Once data were stored I packed the Trimble away and headed down the hill, only stopping to take photos of a delicate cloudscape toward the south as pink tinged high cloud wisped through the sky.

Gathering data at the summit of Bryn Hill

Delicate cloudscape from Bryn Hill

I arrived back at my car after a mile or so of walking on the country lane, by now the sun had sank behind the hills to my south-west, and I changed in to clean clothes as the first chill of evening crept down on the land.  It was only a short drive to Clun and its Youth Hostel for an excellent evening of good company, good conversation, excellent food at a very reasonable price (£3.50 for main course and three puddings) and a talk by a self-employed surveyor who used to work for the Ordnance Survey, a good end to an excellent day.


Survey Result:


Reilth Top

Summit Height:  404.6m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 28458 88105

Col Height:  375.6m (converted to OSGM15) 375.3m (LIDAR data prioritised)

Col Grid Reference:  SO 28861 87869 (SO 28880 87845 LIDAR data prioritised)

Drop:  29.0m (29.3m Trimble summit and LIDAR col) (Four reclassified to 400m Sub-Four) 

Dominance:  7.25%



Colebatch Hill

Summit Height:  415.8m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 29223 87474

Drop:  c 98m

Dominance:  23.57%



Bryn Hill

Summit Height:  407.5m (converted to OSGM15)

Summit Grid Reference:  SO 29550 86222

Col Height:  298.9m (converted to OSGM15)

Col Grid Reference:  SO 29299 86584

Drop:  108.6m

Dominance:  26.64%