Guest Contributor

Introduction

If you would like to contribute an article please contact me via the email on the About Me page heading.  The only two stipulations I make are that the article has to be hill related and that I don't end up in court through its publication!  Otherwise the choice of subject matter is down to the Guest Contributor.





Dewi Jones explores his life on the hills and that of being a list ticking hill bagger who ‘bends the lists’.





Steve Smith shares his experience of the completion of the Nuttalls, which are the 2,000ft mountains of both England and Wales.




John Kirk – Geology of and Geological Divisions of Wales

John Kirk examines the geological make-up of Wales from the complexity of Anglesey in the north to the Carboniferous area in the South Wales Valleys.  This detailed analysis determines the Geological Divisions of the country.




Simon Glover – The Furths and their Compleaters

Simon Glover has extensively researched The Furths and documents their listing and compleaters on his blog.  This article concentrates on these 3,000ft mountains and details aspects of the people who have completed an ascent of The Furths.




Carole Engel – Y Pedwarau The Fantastic Fours of Wales


Carole Engel is the third known person to complete Y Pedwarau – the 400m hills of Wales.  In this article she details her experience of the Pedwarau, from her discovery of the list on Geoff Crowder’s v-g.me website, to its re-evaluation as a co-authored list and publication by Europeaklist.







Robin N Campbell examines the criterion that John Rooke Corbett used for his Scottish list that is now known as the Corbetts.  Robin’s article first appeared in The Munro Society (TMS) Journal, with a shortened version later appearing in the SMC Journal.  Both articles are reproduced here and give a fascinating conclusion to the minimum drop Corbett used for his Scottish list.







Adrian has written several Irish hill-walking guidebooks for the Collins Press.  His first book From High Places: A Journey Through Ireland’s Great Mountains won the Outdoor Writers and Photographers Guild (OWPG) Award for Excellence in 2011.  In this article he relates his experience of completing the Vandeleur-Lynams and the Arderins.







Two articles by Richard Moss, the first a biography of his father; Ted Moss, who was one of the most important of the early hill listers, and the second an account of Richard’s completion of his father’s English and Welsh 2,000fts.






John has compiled some of the more progressive hill lists ever produced and in this post he tackles a subject close to his heart; that of Mountain Nationality and the concept of Dual National Hills.







On Monday 13th October 2014 Eddie Dealtry completed the Marilyns, becoming only the second person to do so with the first completion preceding Eddie’s ascent of the St Kilda sea stacks by only one hour.





Rob is one of the country’s leading hill baggers with first completions for the Deweys, Clem-Yeamans, Irish 50 Most Prominent, Thousanders, The Fours, Y Pedwarau and the SubMarilyns of England, Wales and Scotland.  His bagging exploits are now taking him farther afield bagging the world Ultras.  In this article Rob details his completion of the Marilyns on the final two sea stacs of St Kilda.





Aled details the history of Traeth Mawr which is partly the land re-claimed from the sea close to Porthmadog in Eryri.





Bernie details the extension of Eric Yeaman’s Scottish Handbook listing to England and Wales by Clem Clements.





Phil is the website host of Haroldstreet which is one of the leading and innovative websites for hill baggers.





Alan has compiled some of the most important of British hill listings, including the Marilyns, Murdos, Grahams, Corbett Tops, Graham Tops, Hewitts and Sims.  Many people justifiably consider him as Britain's pre-eminent published hill list author.  With the Sims listing he unified the 600m hills of Britain, he’s now considering doing this for another category of hill.

















































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